Sponsors

February 2010
M T W T F S S
« Jan   Mar »
1234567
891011121314
15161718192021
22232425262728

Taking great photographs of a baseball game




Tip 551 (Having great equipment is not a must): For shooting great photographs at a baseball game where the distances can be large, you can see people toting along some great equipment such as 600mm ultra-zoom lenses, and having such equipments do carry some advantages, but if you learn about techniques and keep on learning, you can learn how to make the best of your equipment.

Tip 552 (Keep your reflexes toned): Like any other sport where a ball and a instrument to hit the ball is used, the actual time that the ball is in the air is limited, but when it is moving, it can move pretty fast. Capturing an event such as a home run or a critical out can take quick action and fast reflexes, so ensure that you are fully alert and can move pretty quickly.

Tip 553 (Keep your equipment ready): When shooting at a sports event, keep in mind that you need to have your equipment ready and loaded, including the compromises you make on your lens. If you have specialist lens for different situations, either you can change your lens very quickly, or you have a lens that fits most situations (such as a 18-200 or maybe even a 70-300 lens).

Tip 554 (Focus on the riveting stuff): Look out for the best photos in a baseball game, they will invariably be of a close out or the dust rising from the contact with a base with a feet sliding in, or of the ball at the time of contact on the way to a home run. Keep those areas in focus while shooting, and see how many great photos you can get.

Tip 555 (Get a lens shade): You would have seen those, a plastic flare that fits on the end of lens and increases the thickness of the lens end. This is a lens shade, meant to ensure that the photos do not suffer from sun glare that can cause a lot of imperfections in your photos. If you don’t have one of those and are taking photos where the sun can directly see your lens, then use your hand to prevent the sun rays from directly touching the lens.

Neil Leifer: Ballet in the Dirt: The Golden Age of Baseball




1 comment to Taking great photographs of a baseball game

  • Great tips.
    I would also add to take your widest lens and go trolling the upper levels. The highest points in the stadium as well as the last row in left and right fields usually make for some spectacular panoramic shots of the whole stadium. If it’s your lucky day you might even be up there when the home team does something great and you can then get the crowd celebrating!

    Is it baseball season yet or what 🙂

Leave a Reply

You can use these HTML tags

<a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <s> <strike> <strong>